Pastor's Blog

I am the Teaching Pastor of Southside Baptist Church in Lebanon, TN, married to Sarah, raising four children (Rachel, William, Lydia, & Kate), and seeking to honor God in all things. I received my Bachelor of Science in Psychology from MTSU, and my Master of Divinity in Biblical Studies and Doctor of Philosophy in New Testament and Greek from Mid-...America Baptist Theological Seminary. More

9 Marks of a Healthy Church

9 Marks of a Healthy Church was published by Crossway and written by Mark Dever, pastor of Capital Hill Bapist, Washington D. C., and the executive director of 9 Marks ministries.

Perhaps one of the more troubling facts regarding the current state of most evangelical churches in America is the dire state of their overall spiritual health. I am almost embarrassed to admit it, but I am a late comer to Mark Dever's 9 Marks of  a Healthy Church.  Not only do I verge on shame, I'm actually twinged with regret as I have no doubt that Dever's words of wisdom would have strengthened my many weaknesses and failings in my previous pastoral posts had I read his work earlier.

Dever has accomplished much for the church with this book.  Rather than sit on the sidelines in perplexity at the problems facing too many churches, Dever challenges us to contemplate and (re)commit ourselves to nine of the most fundamental catalysts for church health.  While so many things could be said of this book, I will limit our discussion to a brief summary of each of the nine marks:

1.  Expositional preaching: This is the supreme mark of a healthy church.  God brings spiritual life through the expositional preaching of His word.  Expository preaching is preaching that draws its main point from the main point of a particular passage.

2.  Biblical theology:  A healthy church has a biblical understanding of God's character and ways.  Dever summarized the main thrust of the Bible's teaching on God when he noted, "that He is creating; that He is holy; that He is faithful; that He is loving; and that He is sovereign" (p.60).

3.  The Gospel:  A healthy church recognizes the centraility of the work of Christ (death, burial, resurrection) for all those who would repent of sin and believe in His atoning sacrifice.  This repentance and believe is not simply out of tradition but actually changes the way the believer lives.  True repentance and faith is not just a one time thing but is a lifelong characteristic of the believer.

4.  A biblical understanding of conversion: A healthy church understands that conversion is an act of God.  Just as no one can "born themselves" physically, neither can a person be born again spiritually without the initiating and efficacious working of the God the Holy Spirit.

5. A biblical understanding of evangelism: A healthy church is actively evangelistic, but not necessarily in a programmed sort of way.  Rather, evangelism is the natural overflow of Christian worship and fellowship.  Simply put, the church is the evangelistic program.

6. A biblical understanding of church membership: A healthy church emphasizes and requires faithful membership for the sake of purity, accountability, and mutual edification.

7. Biblical church discipline: A healthy church disciplines blatanly sinning members for the sake of the sinner, the ones offended (other believers and God), and the unbelieving world.

8. A concern for discipleship and growth: A healthy church disciples new believers, as well as more mature believers, with the word of God and in mutual accountability around God's word, most easily done through covenanting together around a common statement of believe such as a church covenant.

9. Biblical church leadership: A healthy church seeks out leaders based not on secular qualifications but on biblical qualifications of godly character and trustworthiness.  Both pastors and congregations will be held accountable for what is being taught from the pulpit.

May the Lord continually purify His church and may His church continually submit to His sanctfiying work so that every local body of Christ will be spiritually healthy for God's glory.

For His Glory,
Jeremy Vanatta
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The Gulf Between Good and Godly

There seems to be a common phrase among many church-goers.  It goes something like this: "They're some good people down there at Insert Church Name."  Yet, if you actually went "down there" to some of these churches you would find out quite quickly that their definition of "good" is not so good.

While we all understand what is meant by this, I have thought about the biblical accuracy of such a phrase.  I have concluded that there is absolutely no biblical foundation for making such a statement, and I hope to demonstrate my claim with three basic points from Scripture:

  1. There is no good personPaul, quoting the Old Testament, reminds us of our depravity before a holy God when he says, "All have turned aside; together they have become worthless; no one does good, not even one." (Romans 3:12).

  2. Only God is goodJesus teaches us this plainly when He says to the Rich Ruler, "Why do you call me good?  No one is good but God alone" (Luke 18:19)

  3. By God's grace, believers are godlyAgain consulting Paul, he reminds us that believers are to be separate from the world.  We are to be godly and that is only possible by God's grace.  "For our boast is this, the testimony of our conscience, that we behaved in the world with simplicity and godly sincerity, not by earthly wisdom but by the grace of God, and supremely so toward you." (2 Corinthians 1:12).


Based on this simple three point approach, I believe we need to re-orient our belief on what constitues "good" and "godly" for there is a world of difference between the two.   Good, by the world's own estimate, falls far short of the glory of God (Romans 3:23).  For God calls us to be more than "good", He calls us to be godly.  Peter says it like this, "But as he who called you is holy, you also be holy in all your conduct, since it is written, "You shall be holy, for I am holy." (1 Peter 1:15-16).

So, I guess the point I'm getting at is this, who cares if the folks down at the local church are "good" if they aren't godly?  Is it not of far more importance that God's church be known in the community as being godly and holy people?  Is not God's gracious imputation of His righteousness the only thing that separates believers from unbelievers?  Lest we be godly, we will be nothing more than the world around us is? (1 Peter 2:11-12).  So let God's people, who have been saved by His grace, be godly.

For His Glory,
Jeremy Vanatta
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Church Planter

Church Planter: The Man, The Message, The Mission was published by Crossway and written by Darren Patrick, who is the vice president of the Acts 29 Network and the founding pastor of The Journey Church in St. Louis.  Patrick has organized the material for his book around the simple premise noted in the title and sub-title.  It seems good to present this review with that same organization in mind.

Church Planter: The Man--In essence, Patrick describes the qualified church planter as a man who has been genuinely saved by grace, called of God, meeting the biblical qualifications of elder/bishop/pastor, who is dependent on God, skilled in teaching the Bible, able to shephered the flock of God, and determined not to turn his back on the task no matter the personal cost.

Church Planter: The Message--In this section, Patrick discusses the message that the qualified church planter will proclaim.  The message is the gospel of Jesus Christ, a message rooted in actual history, that results in salvation for all that repent of sin and believe in Christ, a message that is centered on Christ rather than sinful man, that exposes sin for what it is and what it does, and a message that destroys man-made idols that hinder whole-hearted worship of God.

Church Planter: The Mission--Patrick ends the book with this section on the church planter's mission.  Each chapter addresses an area of the mission including the necessity of the church planter having a compassionate heart, carrying out the mission through the local church (as opposed to para-church organizations), contextualizing the gospel, caring for the less fortunate, and hoping and aiming for city transformation.

Strengths of the book include Patricks' faithfulness to the Bible and biblical orthodoxy when addressing issues in the sections on The Man and The Message.  For Patrick, the church planter must be a man, and a saved, called, qualified man at that.  Additionally, the church planter must be a preacher of the historical, saving, Christ-centered gospel that exposes sin and crushes idols.  This is a breath of fresh air in an area that too often encounters mush.  The Mission section also challenged the reader to think deeply about how compassion is a key component for every church planter and every pastor in general.  Each of these strengths coupled with the fact that the book is an introductory work for church planting types, makes it a valuable tool.

Weaknesses of the book are most notable in the final section The Mission.  The previous sections were outstanding material, especially for potential church planters who may not have a solid foundation in the areas of biblical qualifications of pastors and the biblical understanding of the gospel.  Patrick's  section on the church planter's mission was also insightful, yet it lacked the jolt of the previous discussions.  The greatest weakness of The Mission was the discussion of contextualization.  To be fair, Patrick acknowledged the slippery slope of contextualization.  On one end there is under-contextualization that ignores a cultures "language, customs, politics, and belief systems" (p.194).  On the other end there is over-contextualization that subverts the gospel to the authority of culture.  I agree with his point here.  While I also agree with Patrick's main premise that the church will always carry cultural baggage and have a certain cultural flavor to it, I do think too much is made of this principle in the book.  As I have heard Thabiti Anyabwile say, the church is indeed multi-ethnic but that does not mean it is multi-cultural.  Rather, the church has its own culture, which in reality is counter-cultural.  There is neither time nor space to elaborate on the issue here, so much has been left unsaid.  All in all, Patrick has done a good job handling even this aspect of church planting.

For His Glory,
Jeremy Vanatta
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Call His Name Jesus

I love Christmas.  I love the sights, sounds, songs, and smells.  I love the candies.  I love the family reunions and the gathering of friends.  I love the gifts and the givers.  But as much as I love these things, I do not love them in and of themselves.  I love these things because they remind me of the One who loved me first.

Every year there seem to be more and more stress-laden, unhappy partakers in the holiday we call Christmas.  It is almost as if someone forgot to give these pessimistic prunes the memo: CHRISTmas is coming.  On the other extreme, you have the euphorical extremists all tanked up on the materialism of it all.  It is almost as if someone forgot to give these optimistic ones the same memo: CHRISTmas is coming.  You see, both have lost sight of the bigger picture and turned in on themselves as the center of Christmas.

But Christmas is far from being about self and what self wants. Christmas is about the Christ child who was sent on a mission by God.  This was a rescue mission.  The mission was this: deliver God's people from themSELVES.  For the child born in a stable and laid in a manger grew up to be the man of sorrows, crushed for the inquities of His people.  So Christmas should never be about fulfilling our selfish desires, no matter what form they take. Christmas, always and forever, should be about Jesus Christ, Son of God. Christmas should always bring hope to the hopeless, and we all fit that bill.  For without Christ, we all are a hopeless people.  Hopelessly searching for happiness, contentment, or simply stuff.  Hopelessly headed for eternal destruction in hell.

Yet, God reminds us of the simply profound message of Christmas:  "She will bear a son, and you shall call his name Jesus, for he will save his people from their sins" (Matthew 1:21).  Now that is worth celebrating!

Merry Christmas!

Jeremy Vanatta
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Slippery Little Fellas

It seems most natural for man to fear serpents.  All the world over snakes find themselves the repeated targets of panicked ophidiophobics (snake-fearers).  Two memorable occasions stand out in my experience that prove my point.  One was watching a "macho" fifteen year old boy run out of the tobacco field screaming like a lady and cussing like a sailor because he saw a rattlesnake.  The other was observing twenty or so African men in Zimbabwe, along with a few Americans, gathering  around a puff adder with rocks in hand.  I imagined in that moment what it must have felt like to be the woman caught in adultery or Stephen who was martyred for his testimony about Jesus Chirst.  As with Stephen, the puff adder died for his testimony--the adder's testimony being, "Yes, I am an adder.  Here I lie!"

In some ways, man's fear of serpents is unwarranted and more often rooted in frenzy rather than fact.  Serpents, however, can be dangerous creatures depending on the ones you encounter.  Perhaps one of the reasons that man has such difficulty with snakes is because they are simply so stealthy.  Yes, most snakes bite and/or coil, and some snakes use venom on their prey.  But at the end of the day, these predatory features are only as useful as a snake's slipperiness.  They accomplish such stealth via their God-cursed ability of slithering from place to place.

We can draw many parallels between serpents and the perennial enemy of God's church.  Satan, with false teachers under his direction, have always posed a threat to the health of the local expressions of Christ's body.  While we all freely admit that false teachers are dangerous for the church, it is their slithery character that catches us off guard.   Jude reminds us of this dangerous aspect of false teachers when he writes, "Beloved, although I was very eager to write to you about our common salvation, I found it necessary to write appealing to you to contend for the faith that was once for all delivered to the saints.  For certain people have crept in unnoticed who long ago were designated for this condemnation, ungodly people, who pervert the grace of our God into sensuality and deny our only Master and Lord, Jesus Christ" (Jude 3-4).   Notice that they "crept in" (the verb literally means, "to go down into" or "to come alongside").  The implication of the word is saturated with creepiness and stealthiness.  False teachers are indeed slippery little fellas.

Well, since false teachers are so dangerous, what exactly are the dangers?  I will attempt to answer this question only briefly and partially using Scripture as our guide.  False teachers may have one, more, or all of these ten dangerous characteristics:

Dangers of False Teachers

1.  They disguise themselves as sheep but are really ravenous wolves (Matthew 7:15)

2.  They will bring destructive heresies into the church secretly (1 Peter 1:21)

3.  They lead many astray (Matthew 24:11)

4.  They are spoken well of by "all" (Luke 6:26)

5.  They attack true believers (1 Corinthians 11:26)

6.  They preach a form of works-righteousness rather than grace (Galatians 2:4)

7.  They stray from core Christian beliefs (1 Timothy 6:3-4)

8.  They are arrogant, though this may be hidden beneath sheep's clothing (1 Timothy 6:4)

9.  They are greedy and liars (1 Timothy 6:5-10; Titus 1:10-16)

10.  They seek to please man rather than God (2 Timothy 4:3-4)

Therefore, Christians ought to be on the lookout for such Slippery Little Fellas.  Prayerfully, these ten dangers will remind us of their character and tactics.  May God continue to protect His church and His truth from the wiles of the Serpent and all his brood.
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Anti-Santa or Pro-Christ?

[This is an updated version of an article written several years ago]

Christmas is undoubtedly one of my favorite times of the year.  While I abhor the plague of syncretistic paganism that envelopes much of the holiday season as much as the next Christian, God always works it out to His glory.  Despite the world's effort to euthanize Christ from Christmas, the Star of the show shines brightly on.

But all the traditions do pose a challenge for the Christian.  Specifically, how do Christians maintain as central that which is central to Christmas, namely God's plan of salvation for sinners through Jesus?

One of those aspects that my wife and I have wrestled with is Santa Claus.  We both grew up in homes that told their young children that Santa was real, Santa knew all your deeds, and Santa was the giver of gifts at Christmas.  After we married and before God blessed us with children, we began discussing the Santa issue.  After many conversations, we opted out of "being Santa" for our then future children for a variety of reasons, but our top five are below.

1)  Being Santa de-centralizes the centerpiece of Christmas--Jesus:  This one is difficult to get around.  Yes, the historical St. Nick is worthy of respect and honor.  We can learn much from his heralded compassion and kindness.  Yet it remains, that it's all about Jesus.

2)  Being Santa attributes divine characteristics to Santa that belong to Jesus:  In many ways, this may be the most serious issue.  Only the Divine Jesus knows all of our thoughts and deeds.  To ascribe any other being but our God with these divine characteristics is idolatry.  In our minds, it is all pretend.  In the minds of children, it is somethhing altogether different, which leads  to numbers three and four.

3)  Being Santa lends itself to covetousness and idolatry rather than worship of Jesus:  If our children are more concerned about Santa because of what kinds of gifts he can bring than they are about Jesus for the gift that He is to sinners, then we have contributed to our children's already idolatrous nature.  In addition, I've heard many parents proclaim they're love of "being Santa" because of the priceless "joy" or "look on my kids' faces."  It seems this is a slippery slope toward parents idolizing their children rather than worshipping Jesus.

4)  Being Santa introduces mythological themes into historical realityChristmas is about the truth  of Jesus Christ.  Why then would the believer want to introduce mythological elements into a holiday that Christians celebrate as a historical reality, that Christ is born?

5)  Being Santa lends itself to immorality rather than holiness:  Since many parents that "do Santa" lie to their children about Santa, then one must question the very foundation of "doing Santa."  This is not the same as a temporary, birthday-surprise type situation.  We are talking about a deception that is maintained anywhere from three to ten years.  Add to this, Christmas is supposed to be about the truth that Jesus is indeed "the way, the truth, and the life" (John 14:6).  Therefore, it does not seem the wiser to mix fact and fiction at Christmas time.

Of course, many people (often professing Christians) seem to have a beef with folks like us.  Some are genuinely curious as to why we don't do Santa.  Others are downright indignant.  Here's some of the reactions we received over the years:

1)  "Aren't your kids missing out on all the fun at Christmas?"An alternate version of this questions is, "Aren't your kids missing out on their childhood?"  Of course, this assumes that Christmas is about having fun and getting stuff.  Now granted, Christmas is lots of fun and should be, but I know plenty of children (including mine) that have never been fed the Santa tradition and who think Christmas just as grand.  In essence, they don't really care so much about Santa as they do about getting stuff.  Either way, you have to deal with a child's covetous idolatry (the "Mine, Mine, Mine Syndrome), and we believe that task is best accomplished by focusing on historical truth at Christmas.

2)  "You're just being legalistic."First off, we must use the term legalism carefully, since it often requires that we know the motivations of someone's heart, and we can only know their motivations by getting to know them personally.

Second, legalism can only be legalism if it is a belief or practice that a person believes sets them apart as more righteous than another person and obtains for themselves a more righteous standing with God.  And this is certainly not where we stand.  A Christian's righteous standing with God is by His grace alone through faith in Jesus.  Thus, my wife and I don't judge other Christians for "being Santa."  Rather, this article is not religious dogma but a call to consideration from fellow believers.

3)  "So, you don't celebrate Christmas?":  We were meeting with a group of Christians once, and we happened to share with them that we "don't do Santa".  One lady in the group said, "So, you don't celebrate Christmas?  You don't do gifts?"  Indeed, the Santa myth is deeply ingrained even among adult Christians.  Apparently for some, leaving Santa out of Christmas is no longer Christmas.  Thus, we see plainly the real and present danger of neglecting the Savior during the holiday.

All this to say, let us keep central that which is central at Christmas.  Christians, if you choose to "do Santa", then do it.  But by all means, please be careful in how you deal with the historical truth of Jesus coming into the world at Bethlehem, living a sinless life that we couldn't live ourselves, taking God's wrath against sin that we ourselves deserved at the cross, and rising from the dead so that everyone that turns from sin and follows Him will have eternal life.

Merry Christmas!
Jeremy Vanatta
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Church Planting Is for Wimps

The book Church Planting Is For Wimps is not, as you might guess from the title, your typical approach to the topic of church planting.  As his subtitle notes, the author, Mike McKinley, admits that he is a messed-up person.  Immediately, the (honest) reader can relate.  McKinley served on the staff of Capital Hill Baptist Church, Washington D.C.  In 2005, God called him to revitalize Guilford Baptist Church, Sterling, VA.  This book is a recounting of how God used McKinley to accomplish this feat.

McKinley writes openly and honestly, with humor and insight.  He has a knack for keeping the reader involved in the story.  Of course, the title communicates much sarcasm since the book is the story of a church revitalization as opposed to a fresh plant; but McKinley in no way communicates disdain for church planting.  The book is a must read for those praying about church planting or revitalization.  While there are plenty of wisdom nuggets to be found in the book, I want to share the following three:

1)  Beware of contextualization: while certain aspects of contextualization have their place, it does seem to be the newest catchphrase for the "homogeneous unit principle"--you know, the "pick your social demographic and appeal . . . to them" (p.20) model.  This form of contextualization is problematic for at least two reasons: it caters to the flesh rather than the spirit, and it steers God's people away from a gospel-centered unity.  As McKinley noted, "People favor people who favor them.  They favor goods and services tailored to their tastes and how they want to perceive themselves.  Niche marketing works." (p.17).  But, as he went on, "if you look at what the Bible says on this subject, you'll see that one of the glories of the gospel is that it reconciles people that could never be reconciled without it." (p.18).

2)  The preaching of God's word must be central: McKinley reminds us that if we fail to preach the word of God, then we fail altogether.  He wrote, "the one thing that Christians and non-Christians need is the Word of God.  It is alive and powerful, and it's what our churches need." (p.53).  He encourages the church planter to never allow the the preaching of the Word to be decentralized by a plethora of pragmatic and administrative details.

3) Beware of "obessing over church size": McKinley spoke plainly on this point, "Let me be straightforward.  The obsession with church size is killing many church planters.  I used to drop in occasionally on a gathering of local church planters.  There was a running tension in the group--everyone either subtly bragged about the size of his church (while trying to seem like they weren't) or made excuses for it." (p.107).  He warns us of the clear and present danger of numberitis.

While these three points fall short of all that Church Planting Is For Wimps relates to the reader, they do serve as a launching point for those interested in further helps in the arena of church planting and revitalization.

For His Glory,
Jeremy Vanatta
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The Unquenchable Flame

The Unquenchable Flame: Discovering the Heart of the Reformation, written by Michael Reeves, the Theological Advisor for the Universities and Colleges Christian Fellowship.  Reeves has written a concise and comedic history of the sixteenth-century Reformation.  To use the adjectives "concise" and "comedic" to describe a history book may seem oxymoronic, but both words fit the bill.  Not only this, Reeves' account is accurate, balanced, and thoughtful.

Space would not allow for sharing all of the most significant points that this little book brings to light, but I must note at least the following four:

1)  The Reformers, while far from perfect in a variety of ways, risked all for the sake of returning the Church to a biblical understanding of the gospel: grace alone, faith alone, Scripture alone, Christ alone, God's glory alone.

2)  Opponents of the gospel hate God's word.  The Roman Catholic Church and its devotees feared the translation of God's word into "common" languages more than anything else because they knew it would lead to the questioning of their authority regarding church tradition and popish dogma.  We can find a correlation with today.  Today, many professing Christians hate the expositional preaching of God's word either out of fear or flat out boredom.  Those that fear it do so because it challenges their traditions and preconceived notions of God, not to mention that it brings them face to face with some of the most difficult texts in Scripture such as, "He who endures to the end will be saved." (Matt.24:13); and "No one can come to me unless the Father who sent Me draws Him." (John 6:44).  Those that find it boring usually do so because they want their flesh fed (John 6:25-27) or are simply indifferent (1 Cor. 2:14).

3) The heart of the Reformation was not political but religious.  Now admitedly, the radical fringes were quite political, and even the mainstream reformers found themselves inextricably intertwnined in political issues.  The heart of the Luthers, Calvins, and Zwinglis, however, was one of religious intent.  For the likes of these, the Reformation was about the truth of salvation.

4) Related to the previous point, the heart of the Reformation was justification by faith alone.  If all other things could be agreed upon, yet it remains that the marked difference between Catholic and Protestant was and is the doctrine of justification by faith.  Luther said, "Nothing in this article can be given up or compromised even if heaven and earth and things temporal should be destroyed." because it is the belief "on which the church stands or falls".  Reeves concurs, "Justification was what made the Reformation the Reformation." (p.176).  It is here that the line must be drawn and maintained.  For the Catholic, justification by faith is the process of becoming more holy and thus becoming more worthy of salvation.  For Reformers, justification by faith is the declaration of God that the sinner, whille still a sinner, has been given the righteousness of Christ.  The argument may seem to be a mere wrangling over words, and at one level that is true; but it is so much more than that.  What is at stake when one wrangles with these hot-bed words?  The gospel itself.  The Catholic side says one must develop a righteousness, with God's help, that will result in salvation.  The Reformer says one must simply receive the righteousness of Christ by God's grace through faith in Christ, which results in salvation.

In conclusion, we must ask with Reeves and many other contemporary figures, "Is the Reformation over?  Reeves, and I with him, give a resounding, "NO!"  As long as the enemy continues to lead so many (including Protestants) into the error of thinking that the sinner can muster up a righteousness of his own in order to obtain salvation, the Reformation must continue to cry, "Solus Christus!"

For His Glory,
Jeremy Vanatta
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Essential Things or Not: Do All to the Glory of God

Perhaps one of the greatest struggles for followers of Jesus Christ is the very real tension between essential and less-essential matters within Christianity.  If the The Threshing Floor is going to be of any use to anyone (not the least of which, me), then we must bear in mind that some wheat kernels that fall to the ground are less essential than others.  When we speak of essential matters, most Christians are referring to the most fundamental truths of Christianity.  Truths that would render Christianity quite unremarkable and quite impotent if they were ignored or adjusted.

What are some of these essential truths (also referred to as core or fundamental truths)?  To name only a few, we should mention: the sovereignty and holiness of God; the sinfulness of man; the virgin conception of Jesus, His substitutionary atonement and bodily resurrection; His Second Coming; justification of the sinner by faith in Christ alone; and the sanctification of all those who are genuinely His.

What, then, are some of the less-essential truths (also known as non-core or secondary truths)?  Again to name only a few, we should mention: Sabbath-keeping; frequency of Lord Supper observance; food choices; clothing choices; alcohol consumption; tattoos; styles of music; speaking in tongues; and the list could go on and on.

On all of the essential truths, Christians must be inflexible and vigilant as the assaults of the enemy are relentless here.  We can in no way deny these truths without denying the very core of Christianity itself. But what should Christians do with the less-essential truths of Christianity?  Paul's instructions to the Corinthians can be especially helpful here.

In 1 Corinthians 10:23-33, Paul writes about the less-essential issue of meat that has been sacrificed to idols.  Should a Christian eat or not?  Many believers would immediately answer, "No way!  Don't eat it!"  But Paul instructs us differently.  He actually says, "Eat" (v.25), although we should be able to answer "Yes!" to at least two questions:
1)  Is it helpful to my neighbor? (1 Cor.10:23-24; Rom.14:13-19)
2)  Does it bring glory to God? (1 Cor.10:31)

If the answer to either question is no, then the Christian must not partake.  If, however, the Christian's conscience is clear on these two points, then he may proceed, all to the glory of God.  I pray this helps us in at least some small way to navigate the often confusing maze of truth.
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Threshing It Out

Some may wonder why I've chosen "The Threshing Floor" as the title for my new blog.  To explain, I must first describe what a threshing floor exactly is.  In pre-modern cultures, the threshing floor is a flat surface made of dirt or stone where the harvested wheat stalks are brought so that the wheat grains can be separated from the chaff.  The workers smack the wheat stalks against a hard surface until the grain heads are removed.  They then grab their winnowing forks, scoop up a load of the wheat/chaff, toss it into the air and let wind and gravity finish the job.  The chaff is blown away by the wind and the good grain falls to the threshing floor.

For many years, people have used the threshing floor as a metaphor for life.  Just as the wheat must be separated from the chaff before it can serve any good purpose, so too must truth be separated from falsehood, especially as it relates to our Creator God.  This is the sole intention of "The Threshing Floor."  Here we will strive to separate the truth from fiction when it comes to any number of biblical issues, for there is more at stake than many may realize, even our very souls.

So I hope you join me here on The Threshing Floor as we thresh out the truth.

For His Glory,
Jeremy
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A Whole New World

Well, here goes.  I've resisted the blogging world for some time.  I've come close via my Facebook account but never an actual blog.  So this will be the beginning of a beautiful thing perhaps.  I am new to how these work exactly.  Therefore, I ask for much patience as I strive to set it up and use it for the glory of God and the building up of people.
For His Glory,
Jeremy Vanatta
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